Call of Duty: A Question from their Biggest fan

See the source image So I am sitting here eating my whole wheat bbq chicken TBLT (turkey bacon, lettuce, and tomato) and staring at my twitter feed hoping for more Bears news. Another teacher walks in and does the head nod signaling of course hello. Most people use the head nod in my experience because of fear. They are scared to say hello or scared to interrupt you. Some think it looks cool (it doesn't) but I try to spend less time thinking of those people than I do eating tofu.

This teacher warmed up their food in the microwave and sat two tables away from me. Not far enough to say hey don't talk to me, but not close enough to say hey lets talk right now.

So I finished watching my dude Turbo talking with the media (thank you Atlanta for letting us get him) and put my phone down. I introduced myself to the teacher and starting talking back and forth about what we do, how long we've been here, etc. I got up to toss my yogurt in the trash, grabbed my stuff and sat down next to the teacher and continued our chat.

Then the question was brought up. Games of the video persuasion. This is one of the hardest things I have to maneuver as a teacher. Some teachers love games, many hate them. The line is black and white and its hard to find many in the grey area.

I responded to the question and said I play a lot of games and gave my whys, to get to know my students better by relating to their passion as well as I love them now and enjoy this form of media.

The teacher breathed a sigh of relief and told me they were a gamer as well and his favorite types of games, rpgs. We chatted for a few more minutes and I told him if he wanted to try the xbox (he is a sony guy) there is one in my office and he is free to jump on. As I walked to my office I began to think of my favorite types of games, shooters and sports games. Then I thought of Call of Duty, easily the franchise I spent the most money on. And then this hit me.

WHY IN THE WORLD IS THERE NOT A CALL OF DUTY GAME THAT ALLOWS MULTIPLAYER CAMPAIGN!

How is that not a thing? Why cant we jump into the battlefield together and conquer levels and take out bad guys? Why is their not a story mode that engages you with your friends instead of you being forced to play alone. If Destiny can do it so well, why cant they?

This would be the best COD mode since Team Deathmatch. Could you imagine you are storming the beach, pinned down and trying to find a whole in the lines. Then your best friend draws their fire and you push through to secure a bunker and protect other players. I mean how awesome would that be? So much HYPE I cant even contain myself.

What do you think, what are your thoughts on this? I mean doesn't that make sense in this world of gaming that this is a thing?

Ok headed to work, reach out to @psvgkevin @psvgblog @thecoachhulk @datyus and we will have to chat this up. Love ya'll and talk to you later.

e3 Press Conferences are outdated

See the source image Every year during E3 week, video game publishers talk about the games they’re planning to release in the next couple of years (or, sometime in the next decade at least…). It’s an exciting time to be a gamer, as we learn about the worlds we will be inhabiting.

A host of companies hold live presentations to reveal the latest games, and the bevy of gaming media across the globe grade these companies on how well the presentations went. (Hey, we’ve got coverage of every conference here at PSVG. Subscribe to the podcast feed!)

But we spend too much time talking about how the presenters did. Was there enough gameplay? Were there enough surprises? Too much time on mobile games? Why’d they waste so much time on live music and YouTube personalities!?

The thing is, the world and how we consume media have changed greatly since the first Electronics Entertainment Expo more than two decades ago. Gaming itself has broken into the mainstream, with millions of people watching and playing games all over the world. More people watch eSports. More than 100 million people watch the largest League of Legends tournaments online.

Many hardcore gamers get their gaming news straight from the source — the Playstation Blog debuts games on a near-daily basis. YouTube personalities play a role in showing off developers’ hard work.

And, yet...we sit and watch as EA, Microsoft, Bethesda, Devolver, Ubisoft, Square Enix and PlayStation get up on stages and talk about games. Everything between gameplay is derided as pointless, unless you have a charismatic person like Todd Howard who doesn’t fully rely on a teleprompter.

The information revealed in these staid presentations could easily be included in standard press releases, accompanied by videos. Nintendo’s Directs have this flavor, but the idea could easily be adapted to fit each company’s corporate flavor. This year’s Direct was fantastic, with about 20 minutes of fast-hitting trailers and announcements, followed by a 25-minute deep dive into Super Smash Bros. Ultimate.

The best part of E3 — for me — is in perusing through the deluge of news and picking out what I’m interested in learning more about. The coverage that mainstream sites like IGN, Kinda Funny, Polygon and more put up throughout the event is worth far more than the presentations themselves. PlayStation and Nintendo’s livestreams are far more interesting and informative than the presentations.

I’m not calling for an end to E3 itself, but instead a reimagining of how the information is released. It can cost less, take less time and be for efficient, all while still stoking conversation and getting gamers excited.

There is plenty to be excited about, as well. Personally, I’m super excited for Fallout 76, StarLink, Anthem, Spider-Man, Super Smash Bros. Ultimate and more. But I don’t need to watch hour-long “conferences” to stoke the fire of excitement. I need informative gameplay sessions with insightful commentary and interviews.

These are the views of the author, and not PSVG as a whole.

WedNESday: Blaster Master (1988): A Very (Very) Quick Review

See the source image It’s been difficult for me to find time to write an NES article lately but I felt I needed to get something online.  I decided on writing a very quick review of Sunsoft’s Blaster Master a Metroidvania action platformer released in 1988.  I’ve discussed Blaster Master before and have a certain nostalgia for the game as I think it was one of the first games of its kind that I actually beat, and I was absolutely captured by the seamless melding of genres: A platformer in the overworld, a top-down shooter in the dungeons.

In the game you play a kid driving a tank around a strange world.  Leaving the tank outside you are vulnerable, but you must enter dungeons to find upgrades and face each level’s boss, after which you will obtain an upgrade that allows you to traverse deeper into the world.  Each level contains distinct obstacles that require new abilities to overcome and the game uses difficulty progression quite well. The player is also forced to backtrack at times, with level entrances located inside of areas from previous stages that were inaccessible without specific abilities; a core staple of the Metroidvania genre.  The dungeons are short top-down action segments in which you control the hero as you collect gun upgrades to power yourself up before facing off with the level bosses.

I wouldn’t exactly call Blaster Master hard.  It is a lot like other titles such as Simon’s Quest and Rygar.  Once you know where to go, the game is actually quite direct and simple.  What saves it from mediocrity is that it is a well-crafted action game and it easily ranks among the best titles on the NES.  I believe one of the challenges a game like this faces at its age of nearly 30 years is falling into obscurity. Fortunately, Blaster Master Zero does exist for the 3DS and it is effectively a remake of the original, with a few improvements to the world to made the game longer and add some more exploration and depth and just add some necessary modernization.For collectors, Blaster Master is a pretty easy find.  It typically doesn’t run more than $10 and is certainly worth adding to any NES collection.  Chances are if you’re already collecting, you either have this one or it's on your list. For everyone else, the original game is definitely worth checking out on its own, even if you already have played through the remake.

WedNESday: Tiger-Heli

Less than a year after its release, the Nintendo Entertainment System was a hot ticket item in the US.  Finally it appeared there was a savior for the dying games industry, which by 1985 had lost roughly 95% of all market value since its 1983 revenue peak!  After Nintendo almost single-handedly revitalized the gaming market by labeling the NES as an “entertainment system”, not a “video game system” (hence the famous “toaster” model not having a top-slot), more and more companies were encouraged to fill up the NES library.  For many publishers, ports of popular arcade titles seemed a safe bet.  Even during the games market collapse titles like Dig Dug, Pac-Man and Galaga were doing well on home PC electronics such as the Tandy machines and later the Commodore 64.  So, naturally the big brands who were limping along in Arcades sought to get as much of their software NES-ready as quickly as possible.  The question was, “How do we get all of these games ready for the NES by next Christmas?!”  Outsourcing, of course!  By 1986 (less than a year after the NES’s North American launch) there were dozens of ports of classic arcade games on the console, many developed by unnamed, third-party contractors.  Some were reworked from Famicom ports of arcade cabs that either had very limited releases in the US from Japan but others were pretty solid 1-to-1 ports of the most internationally-popular arcade games of the time; as best as the NES could manage anyway, due to the obvious hardware limitations of the console versus its arcade contemporaries.  Still, weaknesses of the console hardware aside, many of these arcade ports were very, very well done. Taito’s 1985 arcade classic Tiger-Heli received its NES port (redesigned by the short-lived Micronics) this very same year.  Micronics is an interesting company, having done NES and SNES ports of arcade games not only from Taito but Capcom, SNK and Activision.  They were not originally credited for their ports but Kazzo Yagi, the principal software engineer for Micronics, was open about the company’s involvement.  Nintendo, as well as a few of the major brands such as Capcom, felt that having the copyright owner’s label on the game (despite not actually developing the NES port) would help the game sell as many of the games they published from Japanese arcades actually did not receive a wide US release.

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Tiger-Heli is a very simplistic vertical shooter in the vein of Capcom’s 1942 (another Micronics port from the same period) in which you pilot a tiny helicopter through very long gauntlets of bullets and waves of enemies.  That said, I  believe Tiger-Heli is harder than 1942.  In fact, this is a prime example of “Nintendo-hard”.  Tiger-Heli’s difficulty stems from the slow-moving chopper you have to negotiate through scattering bullets and a global timer that often has all enemies on screen firing at the same time.  In terms of bullet hell games, this might seem like something that would make things easier, but not here.  You just do not move fast enough sometimes to get through the waves of bullets and your chopper’s hitbox is pretty large compared to that of other NES SHMUP’s.  

There are a few things to help you, though.  Your tiger doesn’t go “splat” on a single hit.  You have three health per life and when you are struck, bombs scatter around the place you were damaged, hitting enemies in a radius near where you were hit.  Powerups are also plentiful and include health pickups and support choppers who fly by your side firing either upward, expanding the width of your shots, or sideways to support taking out enemies who creep from the left or right.  Tiger-Heli also has destructible environments, so you can enjoy the comedy of flying over an unnamed suburban landscape and mindlessly blowing up all the denizens’ cars that are parked haphazardly in the grass near their tiny, 8-bit homes!

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Graphically Tiger-Heli doesn’t do much to impress.  It’s certainly more impressive than the endless waters of 1942 or the grey, black and blue anti-landscapes of Xevious, though.  There are just far more varied environments and slightly more detail to parts of the world.  This doesn’t stop things from getting repetitive, however.  Still, the game looks fine compared to its arcade counterpart.  In fact, the objects have an almost vector-style to them, a visual theme that was common in arcades at the time, but no so much on consoles.  The sound is also fine, but I hope you like the music you hear, because there are four songs you will hear in every stage, over and over again, and that’s it!  In terms of the sound, we are definitely not talking Konami-levels of audio variety and quality here.

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I would call Tiger-Heli a fun “score attack” game.  Pick it up and see how far you make it and see if you can improve upon your score.  There are two sequels as well.  The first, Twin Cobra, received an NES port but the third title, Twin Cobra II, did not.  In fact, the only port the final entry in the series ever saw was for the Sega Saturn in Japan that today ranks among the rarest and most valuable games on the system, and for the Saturn that is saying something!  Tiger-Heli on the NES though is a very, very common game.  You can typically find these lying in piles for a few bucks and, honestly, if you do not have it and you do see it, pick it up!  It’s certainly worth owning and is one of the better deals in terms of challenge and replayability in the “very-common” category.

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Retro Game Review: Color a Dinosaur- A Jurassic Waste of Time!

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"Ages 3 to 6" is printed on the hideous box for Color a Dinosaur. "3 to 6"... That alone should be a brontosaurus-sized red flag on its own for any video game, but this is not a video game. Color a Dinosaur is a distraction at best; A pointless, boring, hideous distraction.

Developed by FarSight Studios and published by Virgin Games in 1993, Color a Dinosaur is an art program released for the NES where you do just what the title suggests. You pick from a list of pre-drawn coloring-book-style dinosaurs at the start, and you are taken to a menu where you have 10 patern options to fill the dino in. You can also change the color filter from a small palette, but it does little to reduce the monotony. When you are done, pressing start returns you to the dinosaur selection screen.

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That's really all there is to this "game". It is simple, bland, and is hands-down one of the worst flops on the system. This also an interesting successor to another piece of bad FarSight art software for the NES called Videomation, which I may do an article on in the future. So, the question is: Why do an article on something so bland? Well, let's start with a little backstory...

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As a company, FarSight does not have the best track record. They're history revolves primarily around party games, casual fare and sports games that nobody else wanted to make such as the "Backyard" sports titles of the late-aughts, the pathetically-dull Game Party series and, most interestingly, the notorious Action 52 (the Genesis version, anyway), a title infamous both for being one of the worst video games of all time, and for intrudcing gamers to the failed Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles knockoff Cheetahmen. The story behind Action 52 is so insane and so baffling that I would say it alone justifies an an entire article on FarBright Studios' strange legacy that goes all the way up to the United States House of Representatives (I wish I were kidding).

Color A Dinosaur can only be described as hot-garbage, and if it weren't for its shocking rarity, it would be a scrap among scraps. However, as of my writing this article, this dull, ugly, anti-game sits just over $100 in value just for the cartridge on the collector's market. It is indicative of how strange and unpredictable the retro game collectors' market is, especially considering just ten years ago this game was going for less than $20. Somewhere between then and now, this strange video game anomaly has skyrocketed in price in a dramatic fashion and is still trending upwards. It is likely to be one of those titles that plummets in value with the collector's bubble, but something this odd going for so much is telling of just how finicky game collectors are as a greater market.

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Halloween MadNESs: Maniac Mansion (1990)

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In the 80’s, Lucasfilm Games (later to branch off in the 90’s to who we now know as LucasArts) had built up a reputation as a quality games studio and were growing in fame for a number of adventure and puzzle games.  Maniac Mansion was the brainchild of one Ron Gilbert, who is now a legend in the annals of game designers having led the development of some of LucasArts most famous point-and-click adventure games including The Secret of Monkey Island and would also become lead designer at PC game house Humongous Entertainment.  Before all of these big leaps though, he made a strange horror/comedy adventure game inspired loosely by concepts from horror films from the 50’s and 60’s, drawing ideas from many of the same sources as his famous colleague, Double Fine’s lead designer Tim Schafer.

 

 

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Maniac Mansion was ported to our favorite plastic grey toaster in 1990 amidst a bit of controversy.  PC games generally did not translate well to consoles, especially then.  The development process was different, controls were more complex on the PC, and the hardware was generally more powerful.  So, a lot of PC games never saw ports to consoles.  In fact the bevy of ports we see today is a trend that is relatively recent, due to the blending together of PC and console gaming over the years in terms of design and control structure.  Back in the early 90’s though, this was a big, scary deal.  Now, if you were to ask me, I’d say a point-and-click game with a controller is a failed idea at conception.  I personally hate moving a cursor around with a D-pad and even some games that I like do not implement this very well (I’m looking at YOU SNES SimCity).

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Controller complaints aside, the conversion is actually quite good in Maniac Mansion.  Compared to the Commodore 64 version of the game it is a lot slower, and clunkier, but it is a more-or-less faithful recreation of the game from a design perspective.  The writing is the same, albeit somewhat toned-down to meet Nintendo’s stringent content standards, and there is a somewhat unique feel and mood you get from playing the game on the TV, as opposed to the old-school, yellowing 80’s monitor with that awful on-board sound chip (Sound Blaster gods be-praised!).

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The story follows Dave, who resolves to enter the mansion of the mad scientist Dr. Fred to rescue his kidnapped girlfriend.  You can bring along two allies from a group of friends outside, each having their own skills.  The different skills allow the characters to interact with objects in different ways, and allows those characters to open different paths.  This forces you to base how you play through the game around the skills the allies you bring with you possess.  Like Sweet Home, it allows you to switch out allies, but only of one of your cohorts dies at the hands of the mansion’s many horrific baddies.  If an ally is captured and thrown into the dungeon, you are able to rescue them, if you can risk it.  Run out of allies and it’s game over!

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When it comes to visuals, Maniac Mansion looks great and I would contest it is one of the top games on the NES when it comes to graphics.  There is an attention to detail you do not see in a lot of NES titles, especially in ports.  Innocuous background dressing has lines and shadows that go above and beyond what is really needed, making the world feel more real.  The soundtrack is also top-notch, as to be expected from a LucasArts game, but there is something more sophisticated to everything aesthetically, as though it belongs somewhere outside the library of schlock movie licenses and cheap knockoffs in the NES library.  Everything sounds great, and the layers to the sound keep things from being too repetitive.  It never elevates to the level of a title like Castlevania III, but it is a well-made game and there was obvious effort put into making this things look, feel and sound as close to the PC version as possible.

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The good news for collectors is this game is pretty common.  It’s trending up in price due to some newly-found demand, but you can still net a copy of Maniac Mansion in solid condition for about $15.  There is a lot of interest in recent years due to the original’s 30th anniversary, and also because of the recent resurgence in popularity of the point-n-click adventure genre.  Still, if you’re looking for a fun adventure game that will make you think, laugh and even occasionally panic, you can’t really go wrong here, barring the slow-moving cursor doesn’t grate on you too much.

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Diamond In The Rough: Skylar & Plux: Adventure on Clover Island

Long-time and new platformer fans rejoice! The moment you’ve all been waiting for have arrived! As of Wednesday 29th March, Skylar & Plux: Adventure On Clover Island finally has an official release date! Mark your calendars and save the date!

If you want to know more about the aforementioned game and its premise, I suggest you read my previous article.

In light of the release date trailer, the aforesaid game is slated for 19th May 2017. Along with the official release date, the prices are €14.99 and $14.99 (unfortunately, the UK price of the game isn’t presented in said trailer) and it will launch on Steam, PlayStation 4 and Xbox One. Strangely enough, it won’t come out on the Nintendo Switch. Sadly, at the moment only a digital version of the game is available to buy and download. Therefore, there isn’t a physical version.

https://youtu.be/jFEfgutwl2I

You can tell right off the bat this game draws heavy inspiration from the nostalgic, open-world 3D platforming titans of yesteryear that defined the platforming genre such as Ratchet & Clank, Jak And Daxter, Sly Cooper, Super Mario 64, Super Mario Sunshine, Banjo-Kazooie, Crash Bandicoot and Spyro The Dragon. With that being said, it’s like Ratchet & Clank and Jak And Daxter had a baby (with a tinge of Sly Cooper thrown into the mix if the cartoonish 2D art style and the 2D animated scenes are anything to come by).

Skylar and Plux marks the first dynamic duo in video game history to star a female lead protagonist (Banjo and Kazooie and Yooka and Laylee doesn’t count, seeing as Banjo and Yooka are male leads and Kazooie and Laylee are normally considered to be snarky, sassy sidekicks in their respective franchises. Not to mention, Banjo and Yooka’s names are featured first before Kazooie and Laylee’s names in both franchises’ titles of their games).

Within the release date trailer, it revealed a lot of things such as the female narrator projecting her voice into the open air as the massive double doors open to reveal Clover Mountain, a bird’s eye overview of Clover Island, Plux’s recent younger-sounding voice instead of his previous Irish/Scottish-accented voice, Clover Mountain, Forlorn Desert coming into view, the recently-revealed voice of the mechanical arm and so forth in no particular order.

As stated by one of the tweets from the official Skylar & Plux Twitter account which I’ve forgotten to mention in my previous article, Skylar is a silent protagonist just like Jak from Jak And Daxter: The Precursor Legacy. Similar to Daxter, Plux is the goggles-wearing, talkative sidekick and he serves as the comic relief.

According to one of the tweets the official Twitter account of the game posted, a first playthrough lasts for 2.5 hours to 7 hours depending on if the player rushes through the aforementioned game or takes their time to traverse through Clover Island and collect all of the collectibles as well as the numerous challenges and tasks the aforesaid game have to offer.

Unfortunately there is sad news for the die-hard completionists, there is no platinum trophy, which is usually acquired when all of the bronze and silver trophies are earned and unlocked when the tasks and missions are successfully completed and if certain requirements are met as stated in a recent article. Therefore, this game might be the first PlayStation 4 game to not include a platinum trophy.

To make matters worse, there isn’t a physical version of the game being in the works or it isn’t getting released as mentioned in one of the recent tweets the official Skylar & Plux Twitter account uploaded. As said by the tweet below, since Right Nice Games is an indie video game developing team, their resources merely go into the quality of the game instead of mass-producing physical copies of it.

At the moment, information about whether the game will contain a map or a mini-map haven’t been confirmed yet. Naturally, most 3D platformers either include a map that can be accessed via a pause menu or a mini-map is shown at the bottom left or right side of the screen.

As to be expected, this game is faced with a hefty amount of backlash. To the Xbox One gamers, this game is the Ratchet & Clank of the Xbox One or it’s the Ratchet & Clank game they never played and received. To the PlayStation players and the minority of the Ratchet & Clank fanbase, it’s a poor man’s Ratchet & Clank. I don’t want to sound like a broken record but people really need to stop making unnecessary and unfair comparisons. Just because this game shares the same similarities with Ratchet & Clank and earlier 3D platformers from the 90’s and early 2000’s doesn’t make it a rip-off or a bootleg. In this day and age where 3D platformers are scarce, we can’t afford to hate a game before it’s released or judge it by its gameplay, characters, character designs, level designs, character animations and so forth. There’s a fine line between loathing a video game before its release date and judging it unfairly without giving it a second chance. Furthermore, there is also a fine line between a video game made out of pure passion (in other words, a love letter or a tribute) and a cash cow cashing in on nostalgia. Yes, I’m looking at you, Fur Fun (formerly known as Kewpie-Jazzy)! Claiming Skylar & Plux is a rip-off of Ratchet & Clank is like accusing Banjo-Kazooie to be a knock off of Super Mario 64. If you’re curious to check out the true rip-off of Ratchet & Clank, Ruff Trigger: The Vanocore Conspiracy (storyline wise, it’s literally Ratchet & Clank 2: Locked and Loaded, copied word for word) is your answer.

Don’t let the negative nancys (such as this pessimist pictured above) prevent you from trying out Skylar & Plux; it might surprise you just like the Shantae series have surprised me. If you’re a platformer or a Ratchet & Clank fan, then it’s a no brainer this game will make you feel right at home.

My 20 Favorite NES Soundtracks: Part 1

[et_pb_section admin_label="section"][et_pb_row admin_label="row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] So, I’m trying something a little different, I would like to start doing multi-part lists periodically and I wanted to open this with a subject I really enjoy: Video game music.  I have been a fan of game music since the 80’s and I am starting a top 20 here for my favorite soundtracks on the NES.  There are a few things I wanted to take into account when selecting and sorting these entries.  First, the soundtracks are judged on their proportion of good songs to bad or mediocre ones.  Secondly, the more original tunes that are featured on the album that are good the better, so NES classics with 4 or 5 tracks total are going to face an uphill battle.  Lastly, nostalgia is a large factor for me here and this list is in no way definitive.  This is a subjective retrospective on the game soundtracks that have stuck with me through the years.

You will see a lot of soundtracks from a few series and from a number of recurring developers.  This is largely the result of the sound teams on staff and their skill level and even the particular chipset the companies used to enhance the sound of their games, thereby affecting the quality and potential of the music.  Some development teams were better at harnessing the power of the NES than others, but having the best tools doesn’t hurt.  That said, it will ultimately come down to the quality and variety on the soundtracks featured.  So, without further ado, here are the first five of my 20 favorite NES soundtracks:

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Bucky_O_Hare_Box_Art.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

20. Bucky O'Hare (Konami; 1992) Composer: Tomoko Sumiyama

The video game adaptation of this largely-forgotten 90’s Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles knockoff cartoon is actually (and surprisingly) one of the best games on the NES.  Due to poor sales at the time, Bucky O’Hare has become a collector’s item, with prices hovering over $100 and climbing due to the game never seeing another official release after its brief 8-bit run.  Now, the soundtrack is an essential part of the experience for this game as it enhances the already tight gameplay and compliments the level design and aesthetic well.  This is an important and often-underrated aspect of game music because it is not supposed to be something the player outright notices as the music is usually meant to complement and support the action, not overpower it.  The music in many games fails to resonate because it seems out-of-place or too imposing compared to the events unfolding as you play.  A skilled sound team can enhance the experience of playing the game with a well-thought-out soundtrack designed to match the pace and feel of the action.  The music is fast and very high-quality for the NES, showing the true capabilities of the very well and, with a little help from Konami’s VRC series sound chip, it is fuller and more vibrant than most game soundtracks on the platform.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Castlevania_II_Simons_Quest_NA.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

19. Castlevania II: Simon's Quest (Konami; 1987) Composers: Kenichi Matsubara, Satoe Terashima, Kouji Murata

While this is one of the shorter soundtracks on this list, it is also one of the most unforgettable.  Simon’s Quest gave us the series staple theme “Bloody Tears” and while it had a tough act to follow after the masterpiece that was the first Castlevania, it successfully provided a nice tone to the intense action and pace of a game that has had somewhat of a mixed reception by fans but for which I am an admitted apologist.  The music can get repetitive after tireless backtracking but it does drive the game really well, and remembering the first time I entered the woods from town to hear Bloody Tears’ intense introduction just kicks my nostalgia gears into overdrive.  To this day, Castlevania II remains a staple choice for metal guitar covers online and if you want a hardcore rock anthem, it's definitely worth a listen.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Double-Dragon.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

18. Double Dragon (Midway/Tradewest; 1987) Composer: Kazunaka Yamane

The grungy, violent street action thrillers of the 80’s took a while to get their own game but in Double Dragon, they found a fitting albeit loose adaptation.  I honestly feel this to be a somewhat faithful 8-bit recreation of a sleazy crime brawler movie from the period and the soundtrack fits it.  The 8-bit metal anthems are absolutely legendary and show a great deal of sophistication for their time, surpassing many of its well-known contemporaries’ musical achievements by a significant margin. Each of the level themes are well made to fit the attitude of the game and the setting and definitely reflect the period in which it was released.  Also, it was almost unheard of to hear a guitar solo in an NES theme.  That was just nuts!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Ninja-Gaiden.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

17. Ninja Gaiden (Tecmo; 1988) Composers: Keiji Yamagishi, Ryuchi Nitta

Now, I know this is going to be a controversial thing to say, but Ninja Gaiden is hard; Very, very hard.  As a kid I was unable to beat this game legitimately so I often found myself using my trusted Game Genie to burn through it.  I’m glad I did too, because this soundtrack is awesome!  While its ties to the setting are questionable, the beat and mood of the music definitely fits the game’s fast and often chaotic pacing.  This was released in a time before video game music was readily available to listen to online and even before video game Options screens let you leisurely cycle through the various music tracks in the game, so getting all the way through to listen to this soundtrack in full was quite a task.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="1_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/04/Metroid-box.jpg" show_in_lightbox="off" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="left" sticky="off" align="left" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="3_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

16. Metroid (Nintendo; 1986) Composer: Hirokazu Tanaka

One of the earliest entries in this list, Metroid is a classic action title from Nintendo.  At this point I assume it’s safe to say that just about everyone knows about this series, Samus Aran and “Justin Bailey”.  This iconic first entry in the franchise set the standard for an entire genre of action platformer and, while it does show its age, is still a fun game on the whole.  As for the soundtrack, the themes definitely conjure up the feeling of exploring an unknown planet with songs that range from unsettling to heroic.  The best I can do to explain Metroid’s position on this list is just how much it adds to the tone of the game.  If it weren’t for this soundtrack, Metroid would simply not be the same.  It is one of the rare instances where I would say playing this game with the volume turned up is almost a requirement to fully appreciate the experience.  It's also interesting to note that composer "Hip" Tanaka's other credits would include Super Mario Land on the Game Boy, Mother on the Famicom and Mother 2 or, as it's know in North America: Earthbound.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_style="solid"]

Part II, coming very soon, will feature 5 diverse entries with unique sounds including one game that saved a legendary brand and kicked off a franchise for which the masterful music has been performed in concert by the London Philharmonic Orchestra!

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Nintendo eShop Update for January 19.

Well it's been awhile since I posted one of these. Why? Well to be honest the releases haven't been all that great post Christmas in my opinion. Sure there's been a 64 Virtual Console game here and there, but not PSVG post worthy. Well that changes this week especially for 3DS owners. Dragon Quest 8 by all reviews is a great RPG on your 3DS & Yoshi's Wooly World is finally able to be enjoyed by more than those that still play their Wii U's. Nintendo eShop on Nintendo 3DS

  • Dragon Quest VIII: Journey of the Cursed King – Uncover the story of the Cursed King as you save the world from a twisted magician in this genre-defining role-playing game. Across the vast world you’ll wage turn-based battles against more than 250 monsters designed by artist Akira Toriyama. This updated classic also includes new dungeons, bosses, items, quests, scenes and a new possible ending!
  • Punch ClubPunch Club is a boxing tycoon management game with multiple branching storylines. Your goal is clear, but how you get there depends on whether you want to legitimately climb the rankings, or take the more ridiculous, shady route.
  • Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World – Demo Version – Before the Poochy & Yoshi’s Woolly World game launches for the Nintendo 3DS family of systems on Feb. 3, try it out with this free demo. Download it now to experience the beautifully handcrafted world and clever side-scrolling action.
  • Virtual Console on Wii U
    • Star Fox 64 – The Lylat system has been invaded! In this Nintendo 64 classic, take control of the Arwing and skim over the surface of an alien sea, weave through the concrete canyons of a futuristic metropolis or dodge planetoids the size of mountains. Complete 15 missions on your way to the final showdown on planet Venom. It’s up to Fox McCloud and his team of space mercenaries to save the galaxy from the clutches of the evil Andross.

Nintendo eShop sales:

  • January Digital Deals – Nintendo kicked off its first Nintendo eShop sale of the year with January Digital Deals. Fans can save on select digital games for the Nintendo 3DS and Wii U systems, and My Nintendo members can get extra bonus savings on eligible games. Sale ends 8:59 a.m. PT on Jan. 25. See the details at www.nintendo.com/games/sales-and-deals.

Highlights for me include:

  • Happy Home Designer for $16
  • Mario Party 10 for $24
  • Donkey Kong Country for $16
  • Shantae Directors Cut $7
  • Doctor Mario 3DS for $7
  • River City Tokyo Rumber $24 + 10% off for any MyNintendo members.

 

Rise & Shine Review - Xbox One

[et_pb_section admin_label="section" transparent_background="off" allow_player_pause="off" inner_shadow="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" padding_mobile="off" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" make_equal="off" use_custom_gutter="off" fullwidth="off" specialty="off" disabled="off"][et_pb_row admin_label="row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_style="solid" disabled="off" border_color="#ffffff"] Rise & Shine is an adult swim game, so buckle up and prepare for something unique.

As described by the developer: "Welcome to Gamearth, a once peaceful planet now threatened by the warmongering Space grunts of Nexgen. In the aftermath of their devastating first strike a child named Rise is forced to take on the sacred gun Shine - and with it the fate of his world."

If you can pick out some of the gaming parodies already, you’re in for a treat! Rise & Shine is littered with game references!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/rs3.jpg" show_in_lightbox="on" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="top" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_width="1px" border_style="solid" disabled="off"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_style="solid" disabled="off" border_color="#ffffff"]

You play in a fourth wall shattering role, the “Guide.” You see, only a few characters in this world of “Gamearth” get a Guide. This is described to Rise in the early moments of the game. Shortly after, he is gifted a magical gun named “Shine” and sent on his very own quest. 

Rise & Shine has a cool game-play aspect where you eventually unlock a bonus to your gun where you can control the bullet after it is fired. It's very reminiscent of the way you control the batarang in the Batman Arkham series of games. They work in some clever puzzles and boss fights that utilize this feature.

The game also eventually unlocks a bullet “grenade” feature. You can either lob a bullet like a grenade, shoot it straight into the ground, or an enemy, and explode it!

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/rs.jpg" show_in_lightbox="on" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_width="1px" border_style="solid" disabled="off"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/rs2.jpg" show_in_lightbox="on" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="right" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_width="1px" border_style="solid" disabled="off"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_style="solid" disabled="off" border_color="#ffffff"]

Rise & Shine offers up a ton of variety in game-play to keep you entertained after all the homages and parodies stop.

It seems like there is a PSVG conspiracy to give me all the difficult games as well... because this game is hard. Like really hard. It is certainly designed to punish you, as you will quickly notice. You are often bombarded with enemies without notice, some requiring different ammunition to kill. So you are tasked with quickly changing your bullets and your attack type. Not to mention that most bosses have very small weak spots that require a specific attack to hit. You will find yourself playing these fights over and over and over. Thank god for the frequent checkpoints in this game!

One of my favorite parts of the game, and also most annoying, was NPC Village. Here you interact with a series of NPC character who make you play an arbitrary mini game to get an item or some coins that you really do not need. It is extremely hilarious and frustrating at the same time, as these mini games are tedious.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_image admin_label="Image" src="http://www.playsomevideogames.com/wp-content/uploads/2017/01/rs4.jpg" show_in_lightbox="on" url_new_window="off" use_overlay="off" animation="fade_in" sticky="off" align="center" force_fullwidth="off" always_center_on_mobile="on" use_border_color="off" border_color="#ffffff" border_width="1px" border_style="solid" disabled="off"] [/et_pb_image][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="4_4"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_style="solid" disabled="off" border_color="#ffffff"]

The art in this game is incredible, really something enjoyable to look at. I found myself taking a few moments during action breaks just to look at the level for a minute or two. The music is pretty catchy as well. They really knock it out of the park in capturing that retro feel.

So, from fighting “Gears of War” Grunts, watching “Link” get murdered, fighting Zombies, taking a ride in an “airship”, visiting RPG city, catching a glimpse of flappy bird, and your character realizing that he keeps respawning instead of dying, this game is an incredibly fun and challenging experience.

Rise & Shine gets a big thumbs up from this guy. You can pick this game up on PC or Xbox One.

 

Rise & Shine was reviewed on Xbox One using a code provided by the publisher. You can read additional information about PSVG’s review policy on our disclaimer page here.

[/et_pb_text][/et_pb_column][/et_pb_row][et_pb_row admin_label="Row" make_fullwidth="off" use_custom_width="off" width_unit="off" custom_width_px="1080px" custom_width_percent="80%" use_custom_gutter="off" gutter_width="2" padding_mobile="off" allow_player_pause="off" parallax="off" parallax_method="on" make_equal="off" column_padding_mobile="on" parallax_1="off" parallax_method_1="on" parallax_2="off" parallax_method_2="on" parallax_3="off" parallax_method_3="on" parallax_4="off" parallax_method_4="on" disabled="off"][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_circle_counter admin_label="Circle Counter" title="Final Score" number="85" percent_sign="off" background_layout="light" bar_bg_color="#20a31b" disabled="off"] [/et_pb_circle_counter][/et_pb_column][et_pb_column type="1_2"][et_pb_text admin_label="Text" background_layout="light" text_orientation="left" use_border_color="off" border_style="solid" disabled="off"]

Rise & Shine is a action packed side scroller with challenging puzzles and enemies. This is a must play!

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Week of Oct 18 thru Oct 21 Xbox One Releases

Well folks, this has been a week. I was going to just post my original version of this but that felt dishonest and that is something I never want to be with you. What do I mean you may ask dear reader, well my plan was to release our Xbox update for Oct 18th thru October 24th this past Tuesday night due to the fact last week some stuff was added late and I wanted to give you all the gamie goodness you deserve. But then one of my football players got hurt and I wasn't able to post it. So here it is a day late due to hospital visits, team time, and following up with my boy Ky. Ky if you read this, I cant wait to see how strong you come back from this. On to the games.

 

Those Major titles tho:

Batman: Return to Arkham Oct 18th

Battlefield One Oct 18th

Jack Box Party Pack 3 Oct 21

Resident Evil Triple Back

Rock Band Rivals Expansion Oct 18th

 

The Down Low launches:

Mordheim City of the Damned Oct 18 (for those who didn't pre order it)

HoPiko Oct 18

Bug Butcher Oct 18

Horse Racing Oct 21

Slain: Back from Hell Oct 21

 

Game of the Week:

Well folks, this was going to be Rock Band for me, cause I just love that new drum set. However, after spending more time with Battlefield One's campaign I am going to have to recommend that one. My reasoning, because while I was sniping some enemy soldiers during a mission, they shot the windmill I was sitting in, blowing a hole in the wall that I then jumped out and had to scramble to safety from the enemy attack. Folks, please play this game.

bf1

 

Well that's all I got fam, hope this helps you in the search for new games and cant wait to play games with you.

XB1 Achievements

 

This Week's Xbox One Releases 2016

This week is the inaugural edition of our Xbox One weekly game launch article. IGN does it, Major Nelson does, those other sites do it. So we decided, “YO! We PSVG!” So now we are doing it too! So here we are, to tell you what's up and coming in the Xbox empire. So let's get it started! Our release windows will go Tuesday to Monday cause Xbox launches of course on Tuesdays. So without further ado, here are our Xbox One launch games for the week of October 11th thru 17th.  

Those Major titles tho:

 WWE 2k17 digital deluxe 10-10

Duke nukem 3D 20th anniversary 10-11

Gears of War 4 Standard 10-11

Metal Gear Solid V: The Definitive Experience 10-11

Rise of the Tomb Raider DLC 10-11

Payday 2: The Big Score 10-11

Battlefield 1 early enlisted deluxe 10-17

Battlefield 1 ultimate edition 10-17

Batman: Return to Arkham 10-17

 

The Down low launches:

Castle invasion: throne out 10-11

Mantis Burn Racing 10-12

Blue Rider 10-12

Manuel Samuel October 14

Death God University October 14

Mordheim: city of the Damned  10-17

  

GAME OF THE WEEK:

Gears, Battlefield? Even though both are great and I have had a lot of fun playing them early, Coaches game of the week is actually one of our Down low launches. So my Xbox one game of the week is Mordehim: City of the Damned. This game has been on my watch list for a while now and the lore and gameplay are right up my alley. Don’t believe me, click the link below.

  mordheim-city-of-the-damned03-1024x554

CLICK ME TO SEE SOME EPICNESS!!!

http://mordheim-cityofthedamned.com/en/game

 Good Luck with the games and hope to see you online, hunting down those Cheeves and smashing this great lineup of games.

XB1 Achievements

 

Kevin's Weekly Rant: Nintendo, Stop Being Stupid.

Time for my delayed rant for this week (and last week): I’ve held off a little because every time I was ready to talk about this, something else would pop up, adding to my “salty rage,” as Jason so eloquently puts it. Nintendo needs to show us the NX -  like, RIGHT. NOW.  Hell, it should have been a month ago. As more and more “leaks” are coming out around this, Nintendo has been silent the entire time - from speculation regarding what it is, what it looks like, how it functions, and the games listed to launch with it and/or within the first year. At this point, whatever plans Nintendo had in trying to “control the media” on the message behind what the NX is, is LONG gone.

So, we have seen everything from detailed images on form factor to scribbles on a cocktail napkin. As pictured here:LetsPlayVideoGames mockup

Most of them are all pretty similar, at this point, with minor differences in analog stick layouts, controller format, etc.  With so many people reporting on it from different angles, I think it’s pretty safe to assume the end product will look something like what we have seen. We’ve also heard it’s going back to cartridge, similar to what the 3DS uses, through some patent leaks and trademarks.

We’ve also been provided with a list of games that are launching with or within the release window for the console as well. OK, I'm pretty sure all of these are legit, as well with some minor details that probably need to be clarified. Nintendo has also publicly stated that whatever this console is, is not a replacement for the Wii U. That's interesting, because the only major releases left for the console are Paper Mario Color Splash and Legend of Zelda (which is launching for this new console, as well)…everything else coming consists of 3rd party shovelware and indie titles that, for the most part, can already be played on other consoles or PC.  That sounds pretty dead to me (and anyone else with common sense). They also announced a Nintendo Direct for Thursday and explicitly said in it, "WE WILL NOT DISCUSS NX."

So, here is Nintendo’s problem: STOP BEING STUPID, AND TALK ABOUT NX. Your initial plan of not bringing it up at E3 was so that you could control the cycle and reporting; you didn’t want to be overshadowed by the others and wanted the spotlight on you. That’s understandable and I don’t blame you. However, that was back in June. Strong rumors suggest that they will unveil the NX sometime in September. Well, Sony has a press conference coming up, too, so you screwed the pooch on that again, Nintendo.  Because you have chosen to sit it out, all of these leaks are coming to the surface, leaving you with nothing to talk about when you do finally pull the curtain back.  We will all be thinking, "Oh, OK... we already heard about this. Thanks for confirming what I knew back in July, Nintendo." and "Oh, look  - you’re announcing Animal Crossing and Pikmin…cool, but I already knew that, too."  Now, you might say, "BUT Kevin, what if these rumors are not true???"  OK, I can see that happening as well.  Let’s say all of this is not true. Then, we will spend the entire time complaining that it’s not as good as we thought it was going to be: “Oh man, it’s not a portable?!?”  We can see that happening, too. What if they announce it and make no mention of Pokemon? The internet will explode: “I THOUGHT I WAS FINALLY GETTING POKEMON ON A CONSOLE! IT'S BEEN 20 YEARS! WTF???!” ...and so on.

The smartest thing for them to do is come out now, and not let the tension and excitement build up more with these leaks. Set expectations now, so that this doesn’t get worse. You have said you want to make sure the messaging is clear this time around, and that you have the games to support a launch. That’s great. I agree 100% with what you are wanting to do. But with leaks being reported by literally EVERYONE on an almost daily basis, you are losing focus before you even get started.

I have been a Nintendo fan my entire life, and I want them to win so badly with this launch. I want it to be great-  an event, a spectacle…but the longer they stay silent, the more concerned they are making their audience. Nintendo, you need to win over more gamers to stay competitive, while being careful not to leave your core behind in the process. We want to believe! Stop letting us down and show us the NX!

Since we here at Playsomevideogames.com shouldn't be left out of the rumor mill, we have it here first: Sources confirm, Mario NX will be coming...

Mario NX